NSF Funded Plant Discovery in the Southern Philippines Project December 2019 Expedition

December 04, 2019

The Philippines archipelago contains unique floral and faunal diversity that is critically threatened by habitat loss, with only 3-7% of original habitat remaining. To address the urgent need for further documenting this diversity in the face of impending large-scale species extinction, the five year NSF-funded project “Plant Discovery in the Southern Philippines” will document the land plants and lichens of the southern Philippines (Visayas and Mindanao) through a series of large field expeditions and subsequent taxonomic study.

Expedition 2, led by Peter Fritsch of BRIT, will include 20 Filipino and international participants (botanists and lichenologists) who will survey Negros Island and the Marilog Forest on the island of Mindanao over the month of December 2019. The expedition will begin this week and include BRIT participants Peter Fritsch, Manuela Dal Forno, and Brandy Watts.

Philippines
Hoya with strange leaves.
Philippines
Peter Fritsch and colleagues documenting plants.
Philippines
Forest view of Camiguin Island.
Philippines
Peter Fritsch and colleagues collecting a native breadfruit species.

 

Leave A Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and email addresses turn into links automatically.

Related Articles

Botanizing with La Mula Mil

This "Notes from the Field" post is from BRIT Biodiversity Explorer Dr. Sula Vanderplank Riders: Trudi Angell, Leslie Pringle, Theodora “Teddi” Montes, Karen Brown, Polly “Polita” Parker, Marlene Jones, Steve Enright Guides: “Chayo” Nazario Talamantes Cota, “Bule” Raúl de los Santos Martinez ********************************************************************** La Mula Mil (The Mule 1000) is a group of women traveling from San Jose del Cabo to Tecate, Mexico — from the southern tip to the northern border of the Baja California Peninsula — all on mule-back. “ 4 months, 3 women, 2 expeditions, 1000 miles in Mexico by mule.” Beginning last November 3rd, they graciously allowed some of us to accompany stretches of their journey. On the original journey, 50 years ago, botanist Reid Moran travel...
Read More >

A Brand New Wintergreen (Plant, Not Gum)

BRIT’s new Herbarium Director Dr. Peter Fritsch and his Chinese colleagues published an exciting new species discovery in October: Gaultheria gonggashanensis , in the wintergreen genus of the heath family (Ericaceae). The species is named for its unique home on the slopes of spectacular Mt. Gongga in western Sichuan Province, China. Peter and his colleagues knew of the existence of this species from two herbarium specimens collected in 1941 and 1980 by Chinese botanists, but no one, including them, clearly understood that these specimens represented an undescribed species because the specimens were only in fruit, whereas flowers were needed for positive identification. So in September of 2011, Peter and his colleagues traveled to Mt. Gongga, the place where they suspected that the plant wa...
Read More >

Sustainable Ranching in Mexico

This "Notes from the Field" post is from BRIT Biodiversity Explorer Dr. Sula Vanderplank. Mission: launching Alianca da Terra in Mexico. This blog: a visit to the ranch corridor of Cuenca Los Ojos AC in Mexico. Participants: Lilian Jacinto & Jaime Dias (Alianca da Terra) Jose Manuel Perez, Valer Austin, Javier Rivera, & Rafael del Castillo (Cuenca de Los Ojos) Enrique Cisneros Tello (Fondo Mexicano) Francisco “Paco” Ruiz Ramirez (Serranias Del Burro, Rainmaker Trust) The group on the US/MX border (Sula is 4th from left). El Coronado Ranch Early morning walk at El Coronado Day 1. Arriving at the airport I’m met by Jose Manuel Perez of Cuenca Los Ojos and two Brazilian colleagues from Alianca da Terra. We quickly drive out of the city, arriving in the dark to El Coronado Ranch, one of just t...
Read More >

Grey Fox: Exploring an Ancient Maya Center

BRIT researcher associates and colleagues work with the Maya Research Program's Blue Creek Archaeological Project to investigate the flora in far northwestern Belize. The "Grey Fox" site is one of only four Maya plaza-pyramid centers remaining in northwestern Belize.
Read More >