Entrance to Japanese Garden decorated for the Japanese Festival

Fall Japanese Festival Celebrates Nature and Culture

The Fort Worth Botanic Garden | Botanical Research Institute of Texas (FWBG|BRIT) invites guests to celebrate the beauty of fall in the Japanese Garden while exploring the arts and culture of Japan during the November 13-14 Fall Japanese Festival. Tickets are available at: https://brit.org/falljapanesefestival/  

“This festival fosters Japanese and American understanding and provides opportunities to learn about Japan, its people, language and culture,” said Harvey Yamagata, longtime member of the Fort Worth Japanese Society which co-hosts the event each year. “Observing cultural demonstrations such as the traditional tea ceremonies or hearing the powerful sounds of the Taiko drums delivers a true immersive experience.” 

“The cooler temperatures and changing colors of fall provide one of the best times of the year to visit the Garden,” said FWBG |BRIT Executive Vice President Bob Byers. “The Japanese Garden is an iconic part of our campus, and the fall festival highlights its many distinctive natural and architectural features.” 

The two-day festival schedule includes the following events: 

SATURDAY, NOV. 13 

  • 9 a.m. Festival Opens 
  • 10 a.m. The Dondoko Taiko Drummers 
  • 11 a.m. UTA Japanese Culture Society Dance 
  • 12 p.m. Goisagi Taiko Ensemble 
  • 1 – 3 p.m. Fumiko Coburn & Jon Johnston –  
  • Koto/Shamisen 
  • 1 p.m. Miyagi-Ryu Okinawa Dance & Ryukyu Damasi 
  • 1:30 p.m. GK Sugai Japanese Swordsmanship 
  • 2 p.m. The Dojo – Iaido, Jodo, Karate and Aikido 
  • 2:30 p.m. FWJS Kamishibai Theater 
  • 3 p.m. Croft TKD 
  • 4 p.m. Dondoko Taiko Drummers 
  • 4 p.m. FWJS Kamishibai Theater 
  • FWJS Traditional Japanese Tea Ceremonies in the Lecture Hall* at 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m. & 1 p.m. 
    *Cost $3, no tea service 

    SUNDAY, NOV. 14 
  • 9 a.m. Festival Opens 
  • 10 a.m. The Dondoko Taiko Drummers 
  • 11 a.m. UTA Japanese Culture Society Dance 
  • 12 p.m. Goisagi Taiko Ensemble 
  • 1 p.m. The Dojo – Iaido, Jodo, Karate and Aikido 
  • 1 – 3 p.m. Fumiko Coburn – Koto/Shamisen 
  • 1:30 p.m. GK Sugai Japanese Swordsmanship  
  • 2 p.m. FWJS Sakura Dancers 
  • 2:30 p.m. FWJS Kamishibai Theater 
  • 4 p.m. Dondoko Taiko Drummers 
  • 4 p.m. FWJS Kamishibai Theater 
  • FWJS Traditional Japanese Tea Ceremonies in the Lecture Hall* at 10 a.m., 11 a.m. & 12 p.m.  
    *Cost $3, no tea service 

With such large community interest in this event, some safety requirements will be in place. Guests are asked to wear a mask or face covering while indoors or inside the Japanese Garden.  Click here for the digital brochure.

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