Texas Plant Conservation Conference

Research Team

Kim Norton Taylor

Conservation Research Botanist

Erin Flinchbaugh

Conservation Program Assistant

The Texas Plant Conservation Conference is a professional-level meeting serving scientists, land managers, state and federal agencies, local governments, and other professionals with an interest in plant conservation in Texas and adjacent regions. Conference attendees explore current research and conservation projects on rare plants, native plant communities, plant monitoring methods, and plant management practices for native Texas plants. This conference is ideal for conservation organizations, agencies, academics and members of the public interested in native plant conservation. 

The 2020 Texas Plant Conservation Conference (TPCC) is going virtual!

August 13 - 14, 2020

Schedule of Events

Thursday, 13 August 2020

     1-2 PM Session 1: Floristics

     2-3 PM Session 2: Monitoring

     3-4 PM Session 3: Ecology

Friday, 14 August 2020

     1-2 PM Session 4: Restoration

     2-3 PM Session 5: Genetics and Seed Conservation

     3-4 PM Session 6: Strategies and Networks

View the list of presentations here.

What to expect from TPCC – Virtual

  • Video presentations and pre-recorded talks
  • Virtual poster session
  • Comment threads on videos and posters for question and answer between presenters and participants
  • Platform to communicate with colleagues individually or in groups

Registration Now Open

All attendees are required to register. Instructions on accessing the virtual conference will be sent via email to all registered attendees in early August. Click here to register.

Registration Costs

To encourage broader participation and maximize networking opportunities and dissemination of valuable information, registration costs will be waived. In lieu of registration costs, we ask for a small, optional donation to fund student awards. We suggest a $10 donation. Click here to make a donation. 
 

Abstract Submission Now Closed

We are no longer accepting abstract submissions.

Presenters may choose between the following types of presentations:

  • Videos: Short, 3- to 5-minute prerecorded video presentations. These abbreviated presentations should provide a concise overview of projects or themes with emphasis on the broader impacts for plant conservation. Videos will be available to watch on-demand throughout the conference. Presenters will be asked to be online to respond to questions and comments during a designated period. Question and answer will occur through a text forum. Videos seeking feedback about upcoming projects and ideas, major difficulties, or preliminary results are encouraged.
     
  • Poster Presentations: Traditional conference posters will be presented in a digital format. Original poster files (pdf format) will be available to view throughout the conference. Presenters will be asked to be online to respond to questions and comments during a designated period. Question and answer will occur through a text forum. Posters may be presented in any language as long as an English abstract is provided on the poster.

Guidelines for Presenters

Videos  

  • Presentations must be a pre-recorded video.
  • Videos should be no longer than 5 minutes.
  • Videos can be in any style from a traditional PowerPoint presentation to a video in the field. Feel free to get creative.
  • Presenters will be required to upload their video files before the start of the conference. Instructions for uploading videos will be shared before the start of the conference.

Poster Presentations 

  • Posters should be saved as a PDF file.
  • Presenters will be required to upload their poster files before the start of the conference. Instructions for uploading poster files will be shared before the start of the conference.
  • Presenters are encouraged to use larger text than you would typically use for a printed poster, as files will be viewed digitally. We suggest a minimum font size of 24 pt.  

Questions? Contact us at Conservation@BRIT.org

 

Past conferences:

  • 2018 – Fort Worth "Collaborate"
  • 2016 – Fort Worth

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