Phytophilia Blog

Phytophilia = Love of Plants. BRIT’s mission is to conserve our natural heritage by deepening our knowledge of the plant world and achieving public understanding of the value plants bring to life.

Best. Paper. Ever.

I’ll admit it. I’m biased toward brevity. It’s hard to write succinctly, though. Blaise Pascal knew it (“I have made this letter longer than usual,

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Insert Clever Title Here

This article originally appeared in BRIT’s former newsletter publication, Iridos, Issue 20(2) 2009. “Hell — is sitting on a hot stone reading your own scientific publications.”

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The Sweep of Time

Article originally submitted for The Leaflet (June 2014) by Brian Witte, PhD, BRIT Research Associate Most of us live in the moment. Paycheck-to-paycheck, living for the weekend,

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A 54-Year Celebration

The Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas (JBRIT) is celebrating its 54th year of continuous publication. It all started when Lloyd H. Shinners—a member of the Southern

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Preservation and Storage

Herbarium specimens will last hundreds of years if properly cared for. We are committed to providing a secure and easily accessible collection for scientific research.

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Mounting

There is an art to the mounting of plant specimens to their archival quality cardstock backing. BRIT’s volunteers and staff participate in this activity daily.

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Identification

Plant identification requires you have as much of the plant as possible, and in some occassions this cannot be accomplished if you are dealing with a sterile specimen.

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Pressing and Drying

To facilitate specimen storage and use, collected plants must be pressed to a 2-dimensional status and dried to remove any moisture that would encourage fungal growth.

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Plant Collection

Plant collections ought to be made in such a manner as to increase their longevity as preserved herbarium specimens, as well as optimize their usefulness for future research.Plant collections ought to be made in such a manner as to increase their longevity as preserved herbarium specimens, as well as optimize their usefulness for future research.

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Nameless in the Living Herbarium

Article originally published in The Leaflet (March 2014) by Brian Witte, PhD, BRIT Research Associate Identifying a nameless specimen brings tremendous satisfaction. Naming seems simple.  It’s just two

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